Vojtěch Kubašta Exhibit – Part 2

This is a continuation of coverage of the “Pop-Ups from Prague: A Centennial Celebration of the Graphic Artistry of Vojtěch Kubašta (1914-1992)” exhibit, curated by Ellen Rubin, The Pop-Up Lady, and taking place at the Grolier Club through Saturday, March 15th, 2014. (For more information, please see Part 1 of this series of posts.)

Ellen Rubin, The Pop-Up Lady, giving a tour of Kubašta's children's books

Ellen Rubin, The Pop-Up Lady, giving a tour of Kubašta’s children’s books

Kubašta for Kids

A huge portion of Vojtěch Kubašta’s work was designed for children, and it is flat-out, drop-dead, jaw-drop gorgeous stuff. It’s happy and silly and colorful and sometimes a little bit scary—in short, everything children’s illustrations and books should be.

Kubašta’s poster for the 1947 Christmas exhibition of Good Books for Young People, below left, captures both a golden age of Czech children’s books and the magical relationship that develops between children and their books. (Sadly, soon after the exhibition, the rise of Communism lead to the demise of hundreds of publishing companies.)

Clockwise from left: Kubašta's "Good Books for Young People" Exhibition poster, Pop-Up Counting Series of books, and illustration for "Stories from the Honey Hillside"

Clockwise from left: Kubašta’s Good Books for Young People Exhibition poster, Pop-Up Counting Series of books, and illustration for “Stories from the Honey Hillside”

A copy of Moko and Koko in the Jungle was the catalyst for the Pop-Up Lady’s interest in Kubašta.

Kubašta "Moko and Koko in the Jungle"

Kubašta’s “Moko and Koko in the Jungle”

Kubašta created beautiful, richly-colored illustrations for The Runaways and the Robbers. So, it’s something of a tragedy the book was published in only black and white.

Kubašta's art for "The Runaways and Robbers"

“The Runaways and Robbers” – book and art

Fairy Tales

Fairy tales are a common theme in Kubašta’s work; they were immensely popular, and many titles were published in multiple languages and sold around the globe.

Two examples of Kubašta's "Brothers Grimm" work---"The Seven Ravens" and "Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs"

Two examples of Kubašta’s “Brothers Grimm” work—“The Seven Ravens” and “Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs”

Kubašta's "Aladdin" and "Bosbos (Puss in Boots)"

Kubašta’s “Aladdin” and “Bosbos (Puss in Boots)”

Kubašta's art for "What Really Happened in a Fairytale"

Kubašta’s art for “What Really Happened in a Fairytale”

Kubašta's art in "Folktales and Legends"

Kubašta’s art in “Folktales and Legends”

Tip + Top

In the 1960’s, Kubašta and his publishing company, Artia, introduced a series of books all his own about Tip and Top, two colorful pals who go on a series of adventures, together.

Tip and Top

Tip and Top

Detail from "Tip + Top on the Moon"

Detail from “Tip + Top on the Moon”

Kubašta's "Tip + Top Build a Motorcar" (Notice photo in upper righthand corner of Kubašta and his daughter, Dagmar, leaning on table, and a friend)

Kubašta’s “Tip + Top Build a Motorcar” (Notice photo in upper righthand corner, of Kubašta and his daughter, Dagmar [leaning on table] and a friend, reviewing his Tip + Top work.)

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Tomorrow, I complete coverage of the Kubašta exhibit, with a quick look at some Christmas products, a little birthday celebration, and a glance at The Grolier Club’s incredible Dutch Kitchen.

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